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. . with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. >> i wish to yield one minute to the speaker of the house, the honorable, john boehner. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the speaker. the speaker: let me thank my colleague for yielding and i rise in strong support of h.r. 6604 and commend my colleague, the gentlelady from california, ms. pelosi, for sponsoring this resolution. tip o'neill needs no introduction to this body. those respect and admire tip's record, and his long shadow he cast over the people's house. we all know his best known fame, all politics is local. it's certainly true today as we propose to name a building right here at the foot of capitol hill, a stone's throw from this great dome, in honor the our 55th speaker. this is one of those moments when you wonder how the honoree would feel. especially when it's someone like tip who never quite held back his opinions. perhaps he would have enjoyed seeing leaders from opposite sides of the aisle come together to give him a well deserved hurrah. surely he would have go
the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to the rules of the house and house resolution 821, i call up h.r. 6429, the stem jobs act of 2012, as amended, and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6429, a bill to amend the immigration and nationality act to promote innovation, investment, and research in the united states to eliminate the diversity immigrant program, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 821, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of the rules committee print 112-34, modified by the amendment printed in house report 112-697, is adopted. the bill as amended is considered as read. the gentleman from california, mr. issa, and the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, each will control 45 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. issa: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks
tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair will now recognizes the gentleman from california, for five minutes. mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. speaker. i join my colleagues here in congress from both sides of the aisle to call for the end to the war in afghanistan. after more than a decade of war, with now more than ,000 lives lost, and hundreds of millions of american tax dollars spent, it's time for our troops to come home to their families. i represent the military communities of travis air force base and come january i will represent the community of beale air force base as well. i can tell you from firsthand experience that the men and women who serve in our nation's military and their families are america's finest. they are not afraid of sacrifice . they joined the armed forces because they love our country and they are willing to give everything to keep our nation safe. but their sacrifice must be for a reason. if we are going to ask them to risk life and limb on the other side of the world, it must be for a mission that is vital to our nation's security. we can no longer say t
the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance today will be led by the gentleman from california, mr. mcnerney. mr. mcnerney: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker: without objection, so ordered. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, yesterday members of the house foreign affairs committee, led by chairwoman ileana ross schneiderman, heard about the attack on our embassy in benghazi, libya. this resulted in the death of four corner american heroes. sadly -- four american heroes. the people deserve answers as to what happened on the evening of september 11, 2012. why did the administration not make an immediate response in the area of the consulate as requested during the six-h
. this was in california. it seems like natural gas was the obvious way to run energy in this country. thinking about the poll that snapped because of hurricane sandy in the new jersey area along a coast, they underestimated things like that. so, the broader issue is -- how does it work? who controls the rebuilding of our infrastructure? would it be wise to put money into these tubes -- these individual utilities? host: first of all, i wrote this piece. we were sort of talking about it. anyone looking at the big energy picture, not the individual pieces of energy, we spent all of our time talking about oil, gas, and nuclear. we debated about the environmentalists in the business community. we started to realize that, first of all, most americans get their energy from electricity. the change from this energy boom that we had of extracting record amounts of gas from the ground to plug in our homes, that really needs to -- it is the point that you raised about infrastructure. it is about investment in what we already have. about making the natural gas exploration, collection, and distribution system saf
's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. speaker. we're back and america expects that we ought to be going back to work and we have a heavy load ahead of us. we want to make sure that every american has the opportunity to climb that economic and social ladder as high as they want you can go so we have to make sure those ladders of opportunity are in place. we also have to make sure that we are a compassionate nation, that we're willing to reach out to those in our country who have been harmed by devastating natural disasters. we certainly saw this on the east coast and i'd like to spend a good portion of this hour talking about how we as a nation can respond to superstorm sandy and the lessons that we should learn from had disaster. it's not the first that has occurred in america, and it's certainly not going to be the last. in the previous disasters we learned a few lessons but it seems as though we have achieved the necessary wisdom from those
member on the energy and commerce committee, the gentleman from california, mr. waxman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much for yielding to me. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the bill. a warmer planet has less ice, higher sea levels, more water in the atmosphere, more powerful storms, more frequent floods, dreier droughts and worse wildfires. two weeks ago hurricane sandy brought a powerful and tragic reminder that the combination of sea level rise and more powerful storms can be deadly, devastating and extremely costly. hurricane sandy was the only -- only the latest and most dramatic in a series of extreme weather events. over the past two years we've had recordbreaking temperatures , the worst drought in 50 years , major floods, numerous tornadoes and thunderstorms and vast wildfires. this is what global warming looks like. and if we continue to ignore it it will soon look far worse. we should be doing all we can to reduce carbon pollution and slow global warming. but this bill instead tries to s
yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from california, ms. woolsey, for five minutes. ms. woolsey: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, it's the time of year when families reunite and renew their very close connections, connections that are actually in most instances the most precious parts of our lives. this thanksgiving i know all of us were grateful for the company of those we love the most. but more than 2,000 american families sat at tables where there was one less serving of the thanksgiving meal just a week ago. those families lost a loved one in the deadly war in afghanistan. now more than 11 years long and a tragically reckless policy. i'm personally grateful for the service of all of our afghanistan veterans and for their sacrifice and for the sacrifice of our military families. but sometimes i don't know how we as a congress and a nation can look them right straight in the face after everything we've put them through. the benefits of this war don't come close to justifying the devastating human cost. not just fatalities but disfiguring wou
twitter account. first, the program from the commonwealth club in california and th. >> good evening and welcome. i am your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everyone to listen to us online. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. mark feed man is c.e. ofmente and founder of encore.org. an organization working to promote encore careers, second acts for the greater good. he spear headed the experience corp one of the biggest service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize which annually provides five 100,000 dollar prices. >> freedman was described as the voice of aging baby boomers for who are sur suing meaningful and sustaining work for later in life. while the "wall street journal" stated he has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he's the author of "the big shift: navigating the new stage beyond midlife" published in april 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work with a potential to affect our individual lives and collective future. rec
. >> could you see sunday about california? we have had a big shake-up there. >> some are republican on republican and democrat on democrat, where they are spending huge sums of money. as the chairman, it is always a tough race. that is something -- it comes late and we want to make sure we do not get our clock cleaned. i would get nervous about california. >> i always pointed out to my friends that my own state does believe in a referendum or recall. we do not have term limits. >> the redistricting commission was ok. i have become much more sympathetic to a bipartisan redistricting. even if one of those gets over 50%, the top to have to run in the general election. it makes no sense to me and the california system -- >> i like the system because it forces basically candidate to talk to everybody and not just to a narrow slice of the electorate. it makes for better governance. >> it will serve as heads of your congressional campaign committees for your respective parties and you have alluded to the way things have changed since you were running these campaign committees. the influenc
, i know congressman duncan hunter calling from california, he and i are writing a letter. we encouraged our colleagues to sign that letter to the administration, requiring them to comply with the intent of the law. it is unfortunate we have to do that. hopefully we will see some changes in that regard. thank you. >> thank you very much. in march, we are going to hold a jobs fair for veterans. it is interesting. there is an incredible amount of folks that come up. was meeting with franchiser this morning. they have a new initiative to help veterans get inside that business. we are excited by what that means. he mentioned 244,000 claims. do you keep track of the acceptance rate? do you submit them? how often do they make it through the system successfully? >> thank you. it takes so long for them to travel through the system. it is impossible for us to keep an accurate accounting of how many did not. i will tell you that at the board of veterans' appeals, we keep track of the claims that are returned. it breaks down how many claims every year. they did not break them down by the
. we will talk about him later. host: back in 1984 -- guest: the republican party in california is a mirror of the party, and a sense that they lost track of where the country was moving. it was their extreme right wing philosophy and policies which do not match. host: why is that a mirror image of what we are dealing with today? guest: we have had a hard time convincing latinos to register and to vote. an anti-immigration initiative on the ballot. they registered, and now they are a power in california, as they are in other states. you go out and you oppose the dream backact. -- opposed the dream act -- mitt romney saying people should self-deport, sell their house and go back to mexico? you cannot win latino votes when you make war against them. host: one supporting mitt romney in this election said they need to go after hispanic support in 2016. guest: i once thought that man you mentioned was one of the rising stars. when he left the party, i did not buy his reasons for doing so. i did not think republicans should write off the african americans at all. talking about improvi
the gentlelady from california, ms. woolsey, for five minutes. ms. woolsey: mr. speaker, since the house last convened in late september, about 30 more americans have given their lives in the war in afghanistan. the total number of fatalities has now passed 2,000, and as of october 7, we've been at war in afghanistan for a staggering 11 years. that's more than 2,000 families that will have an empty chair this thanksgiving, more than 2,000 families with a void that can't possibly be filled. husbands and wives who will have to go on without their life partner, children missing a parent, parents who are suffering the terrible grief of losing a child. the human cost has become too steep for our nation to bear. we can't ask for our troops and their families to endure any more sacrifice for military occupation. now more than a decade old which has not accomplished its goals and is undermining our national security as well. and of course the fiscal burden is one that rests on the shoulders of every single tax -paying american, the afghanistan price tag will be high even for a successful, well-execut
as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment crews, etc., here into new jersey and new york and connecticut as quickly as possible. and one of the things that we have been able to do, just to give you a sense of how this is an all hands deck approach, we're able to get c-17's, c-130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure in the state. for that we've got emergency generators. we've got a navy ship that has some helicopters that can help to move assets around the state as well. and so we are going to be working with governor christi's office to identify the critical infrastructure and how we can get what's needed as quickly as possible. a couple other things we are concerned about, one is as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure that people can also get to work. obviously there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york, in the city, and in other places where transportati
of mutual aid to bring in, more utility crews from surrounding areas as far south and west as california, those cruz becher drive in and get their relatively fast have driven in. but we still have crews on the west coast that have 3-5 days transit time. there is also concerned that with the fire season, if they could not get back for their fire season was that gets going, that they would not be able to send their resources. there is also aircraft. there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response. but also, understand that teams were already moving well before sandy hit. teams have been called from the midwest and south. if it makes sense that they can drive there faster than flying, then they are driving in. for those that need to, they're flying in this afternoon. >> i am wondering how the contacting process is going. some contracts are already in place. will there be proposals for other types of aid? does fema have enough money with the $3.6 billion? especially when they are only authorized for $3.8 billion. >> yes, we will
in california. when he was left to california, he was shown around by the conservative components of the party, the governor, who voted for roosevelt and he never saw johnson. he took that very personally on election day. he lost california by 3773 votes. it took two days. he was president for 10 minutes. he calls the his apartment in new york, the butler answer is, and he says, "the president- elect has gone to bed." "welcome and will you tell him when he wakes up that he's no longer president?" literally that is what happened. in those days it took a few days to get all of the returns from the west which turned out to be to his volley. been the greatest issue became preparedness. host: this history show a good track record of when these problems arise to finding ways to counteract them or at least fix them before the next elections take place? guest: policy issues? host: or procedures, what ever. guest: survival has a remarkable effect on political parties. it was unified and vehemently anti-wilson. it came up that year to be warren g. harding of ohio. the rest, as they say, is history. host
to other races in the country where they could target rick hubble -- republicans. california there have been two factors, which was to turn the congressional map on its head. we are almost able to ignore california even though it is the biggest day, and maybe watch one or two seats. now we're watching a dozen seats to see which party takes control. when it comes to the senate, if you look at the northern part of the country, if you look at montana, north dakota, indiana, and wisconsin, all four of those races are in our categories, and republicans need to win all four of them if they have any hope of getting the majority. in each one of those that they lose, the chance the republicans will gain back control decreases for the perry >> will there be anything that surprise you? our job is toj avoid as many surprises as process. in hopes of we will avoid a surprise, but i would be surprised if there is not a surprise, particularly on the house side. the presidential battleground, i think the senate battle ground, states we know come on the house side, but almost expect there to be a surpris
illinois and california and are largely redistricting gains. but republican still control the house. what would you say was the democrats' message this election cycle, in terms of the issues are policy? they talked about republican extremism but, what is the strong message that the congressional level? it was two-pronged. one, medicare, and two, the ryan budget. medicare is one of the examples , and the right and budget shows different priorities, and republican parties are wrong. that message did not really .orke it was not a decisive win, certainly at the house level, for that message. my editor mentioned this to me as i was going out the door last night. we had three major house special elections over the last couple of years. one in pennsylvania, mark critz won that one, one in new york when chris lee, he of sending photographs, left office in upstate new york, was replaced by democrat, and the third when the arizona seat opened up after congresswoman giffords stepped down after that horrible shooting, she was replaced by congressman barber. the democrats won all three of those specia
's funeral in california. to some extent, we are just a big family. >> either of your reached out to the obama girls or could you speculate what it is like at their age to be first children? >> well, the answer is no, because i am not been asked. but the second thing i would say is i think there are goods and bads. one, they do not have to worry about dating. >> yet. >> yeah, but even so, they're still pretty young. susan was in her prime. >> i was. [laughter] >> i was all so -- late bloomer, but i was still in there. so, to some extent, i think some of the young men that i would need would want to go out with the secret service and have nothing to do with me. but the negative part is you would go out with somebody and the next day there would be something in the paper, and the poor fellow just wanted to the movies. you know, he was not proposing. and i am sure it probably hurt him with the other girls he was running around with. but we had the advantage of age and hopefully some judgment. now, the other side for the obama children is that they are young and they're very protected
for how they deal with higher education. you have some states like california which has been the premier example planning for the last 50 years. the state university of new york, you know. then you have michigan. and michigan, since the frontier days, has selected anarchy. what that means is each of the 15 public campuses and in the state have constitutional autonomy. we have no umbrella organization, and a shield -- no shield. the philosophy has allowed the university of michigan to develop with one of the los all levels of support. actually, no support at all for education until the late 19th century. they spent all the money but came from selling land and kept it. the university of michigan has learned from that. and consciously over the last several decades has redesigned itself. through a variety of steps, pushing the cold -- the control of resources, the responsibility down to the lowest possible level. that created an organization that was an extraordinarily adapted to change and which at the helm, there's very little concern at all. in fact, the steering wheel was not even connec
the way if is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from california is recognized. >> mr. speaker, as the republican of georgia deals with its first democratic transition of power, i spent the last few days speaking at length with the president and the new prime minister about the necessity to continue the pursuit of the rule of law. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, this is a critical moment for the georgian people that can either put the country on a path of sustainable democracy or turn back the clock on the tremendous gains that have been made since the rose revolution. mr. speaker, the united states must remain engaged with the new government to promote continued democratic reform. a robust democracy demands not only the ability of the majority party to advance the agenda, but also the preservation of the rights of the minority, to raise questions and ho
manufacturing and california. it received some less money to go under. in massachusetts, it was evergreen solar that went bankrupt. to do you think that the government is trying to pick winners and losers in this field? >> i have heard that before. i do not believe in that idea. i believe in a comprehensive policy. the united states is not have that. for a number of things. the renewable energy is -- if you look at an evolutionary process, you always have billion at the start. two point to things life solyndra or the massachusetts failure, there is not a reason to quit. put together a comprehensive renewable energy policy. man sat so in the future we would not have so many failures. -- manage that so in the future we will not have so many failures. >> with that policy include subsidies for electric, batteries for cars? >> i will start to subsidize the renewable energy sector. for 100 years, we have been subsidizing also the o's. we are not close to running out of it. we will run out of them sooner or later. they are polluting. we need to take the money we have been giving a way and say we will
generation from the commonwealth of california with author mark friedman. following that, we will open up our phone lines to get your thoughts of retirement and the economy. we will also open up a twitter hashtag. at 3:00, the united nations security council is set to discuss the situation in israel. we will keep you posted on any possible changes in the security council meeting. >> you career officers, and you changed this army into a volunteer army. go find your soldiers in the labour market. we did that. over five or six years, we created an absolutely splendid force of young men and women who served their country as volunteers. they had the same tradition, culture, loyalty, and dedication as any other group of americans. they prove themselves in the head of an invasion, the gulf war, iraq, and afghanistan. the theme that we have to keep in mind is something that president lincoln said, to care for those who are born out of battle. the windows, the children. to care. never forget that they are carrying the american spirit, the american traditions with them. when they get injured and her, w
ford's funeral in california. we are a big family. >> have either view reached out out to the obama girls? have you speculated on what it is like to be first children at their age? >> no, because i have not been asked. they do not have to worry about dating. [laughter] even so, they are still pretty young. susan was in her prime. [laughter] i was also. late bloomer, but i was still in there. to some extent, i think some of the young man i would meet would want to talk to secret service and have nothing to do with me. you go out with someone at the next day there'd be something in the papers. the poor fellow disappointed to go to the movies. -- just wanted to go to the movies. we have the advantage of age and some judgment. for the obama children, they are young and very protected by their families. they're not quite out front. i hope they are making lots of friends at the schools they are going to. they seem to be doing it. everything i read, that is all i know. because of the senate connection, once a year the senate spouses have a lunch for the first lady. i had the opportunity to
of the second annual "the atlantic meets the pacific" conference at the university of california-san diego is 50 minutes. >> we're going to switch into a future oriented talk. i worked with jane for years at the institute for the future and she is a phenomenon. i could not be happier to get a chance to talk with her in front of you and everybody else in webland. notion developed. >> i started working with the institute for the future. united states. a lot of what we do is look at the technologies and figure out in the future. i had done live ph.d. at berkeley looking at gamers and do in real life. all the communities who would play their games and get all these great skills and look for a juicy problem in the real world that would let them use their skills. and there were none. what i started to do was look for ways you could create experiences that let people use their skills to solve problems. games are helping scientists have to cure cancer and they're working on climate change, everything you can imagine. >> i do not think people world is. when chris was saying 1 billion photos were applaude
. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, this being the first day we've convened since the election i want to begin by expressing my appreciation to our chaplain, father conroy, for his very inspiring and thoughtful prayer. mr. speaker, we are here this week to deal with a very important issue, and i will say that we were all taught as kids, better late than never. we're here because u.s. workers at this point don't have access to 140 million potential consumers for their goods and services. and i'm talking about the vote we're going to have on so-called russia permanent normal trade relations. mr. speaker, vladimir putin is not a good guy. vladimir putin has inflicted horrendous human rights policies on the people of russia. we've seen crony capitalism take hold. and that's why it's very important, mr. speaker, that the uni
former chair of the california democratic party. i do not know what is going to happen there. i believe nancy pelosi will remain and should remain the democratic leader of the house. i do not know that -- i have not heard any talk about a challenge. the last thing the democrats need is an internal squabble. they picked up some seats. the got the white house and the senate. i think there agenda ought to be on moving forward with the issues we have talked about. climate change, immigration reform, and text reform and not internal squabbling. >> our guest is bill press. >> might show is radio and tv. on current tv 3 hours. i will tell you what channel is and is simulcast on progress if talk stations nationwide. if you are lucky enough to have a progressive talk station wyck in madison, wisconsin, you can listen to the show or see it on current tv. host: ron from columbus georgia, independent line. caller: good morning. i do agree with your comment about campaign is over, let's govern. but i am a veteran and i've been a company commander and my point is this, i cannot call my boss and say i
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27